Scientists discover dozens of new species in Pacific

Gummy squirrel (“Psychropotes longicauda”) at 5100 m depth on abyssal sediments in the western CCZ. This animal is ~60 cm long (including tail), with red feeding palps (or “lips”) visibly extended from its anterior end (right). Photo: NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration

RADIO NZ : Scientists discover dozens of new species in Pacific | RNZ News

The zone is a geological submarine fracture measuring 7240km covering 5 million square kilometres between Mexico and Hawaii. Within the zone is the uninhabited Clipperton Island which is part of France.

The Natural History Museum in London reports the expedition, named the DeepCCZ, found a range of extremely rare micro-fauna from starfish to sea cucumbers living on the seabed.

Scientists picked up 55 specimens, among them 48 different species.

The species were discovered using a remotely operated vehicle.

Leader of the museum’s deep sea research group Adrian Glover told the Natural History Museum there was high chance the megafauna was much more diverse.

“However, we have never really had much information on the larger animals we call megafauna as so few samples have been collected.

“This study is the first to suggest that diversity may be high in these groups as well.”

READ FULL ARTICLE : Scientists discover dozens of new species in Pacific | RNZ News

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